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27litres 10th February 2018 11:09 PM

Pecuariam felis
 
I've been trying to work out MJs signature for a while...
"Pecuariam felis"

Now, I've never learned any Latin (or any foreign language actually - not important for the edumacators of my schooling days! Though I have since taught myself some very very very very very basic German and Swedish - enough to know that our sentence structure is unecessarily bulky and back to front!), so had to take an electronic age approach - I used Google Translate!

So that results in "cat herding".
That didn't make a lot of sense...

So I try a couple of (non Google) Latin translators and I get a couple of different answers, such as "animal husbandry" and "work position" - ah! Now we're getting somewhere...

A general Google search suggests "pecuaria felis" instead - "agriculture recipes", hmm... No.

Maybe individual translations will provide some insight:
"Pecuariam" - "herding", we're back to that again!
"felis" - "football", hmm this isn't getting us anywhere!!
"Felis" is "cat", or at least it should be, so why has Google given me "football"??

The best I can find is that "pecuariam" is the feminine of "pecuarius" meaning "of cattle or sheep", but it's still not getting me anywhere!

I'm reading a bit far into this for an exercise in curiosity, and I'm on the verge of signing up for a Latin course!

I want it to mean "workaholic", or "feminine carriage builder" or something, but it's looking a lot like it means "cat lady"!

So please Michaela, satisfy my curiosity!

MikkiJayne 10th February 2018 11:26 PM

It is indeed herding cats +++ An idiom implying futility.

tc4332 10th February 2018 11:57 PM

And there was me thinking you were a cat lover.
We had 17 at one point. SWMBO is a soft touch with all kinds of animals, but I have no room to talk.
Friends of ours run a web page "siliconhell.com", worth a look if you are into cats.

paulrstaylor 11th February 2018 08:44 AM

http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20170...s-to-evolution

MikkiJayne 11th February 2018 09:14 AM

3 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by tc4332 (Post 137627)
And there was me thinking you were a cat lover.
We had 17 at one point. SWMBO is a soft touch with all kinds of animals, but I have no room to talk.
Friends of ours run a web page "siliconhell.com", worth a look if you are into cats.

17? :eek:

I have two maine coons:

Gizmo

http://forum.a8parts.co.uk/attachmen...1&d=1518344165

and Lisbeth

http://forum.a8parts.co.uk/attachmen...1&d=1518344236

http://forum.a8parts.co.uk/attachmen...1&d=1518344236

David's8 11th February 2018 09:42 AM

I guess there's an Australian version of the "herding cats" saying which plays on the fact that getting a group of invidualistic people/animals to get going in the same/right direction can be, as MJ says, a futile task. Herding possums?

Regulus 11th February 2018 10:05 AM

Wow! This an interesting read, Marty. And I love how you explained about the feminine form of the word. Excellent analysis, all in all :)
And the word felis, so that's where the English word feline originates. Cool!
I studied a few languages myself, and love Syntax.

As a kid I had to learn both the Norwegian languages, bokmål and nynorsk. And I got a good grade in both, even if I hated nynorsk. My feelings toward nynorsk would probably have been different, if we had been told the historical background. Both were developed around 1850s. Bokmål means the written language, and since Norway used Danish in official context, bokmål has only a very slight difference to the Danish language (when it is written).
Nynorsk means the New Norwegian language, and is a collection of words used by the natives themselves in different parts of Norway. Hence, nobody speaks "proper" nynorsk. But some variation of it, called dialects. So really just a construct and an attempt to have a distinct Norwegian language.
The further west, or north you get from Oslo, nynorsk dialects are the norm.

I struggled as a kid with English, but that all changed when I started to read books written in English as an adult. As basically all the books I have read as an adult were written in English, so that is the language I have the best vocabulary in. And I read non-fictional books, only rarely fictional.

I moved to Sweden and went to school again as an adult. Among other topics I chose to study languages, as that is something that I love to learn.
I studied German and can read pretty well, I can write and speak some.
I also studied English at that time, but my teachers sometimes struggled with me. As they at times believed I was in error, but upon checking found that I was indeed correct.
So they asked me to dial it back a level, as not to intimidate my fellow class mates.
I studied Russian as well, but learned only a little. I can hardly understand anything as my vocabulary is so weak.
This was back in 93-95. And of course, I had to translate everything to Swedish along with learning the new languages.

At the University I chose to study old greek, or koine greek. Along with my religious studies. My greek is pretty weak, pretty similar level to my Russian.
But I sometimes entertain myself trying to read Russian or Greek words to see if I can understand them :)


What I really learned by all my studies, is what my teacher in German and Russian taught me. As he was in fact a translator, he had a very different approach than any other language teacher I have met.
He focused on syntax. He explained to us that when we learned the the syntax of a language properly, we could move on and start adding to our vocabulary. But it didn't make much sense to him to have us try making conversation.
Best teacher I ever had +++

27litres 12th February 2018 02:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by David's8 (Post 137643)
I guess there's an Australian version of the "herding cats"... Herding possums?

Nah,
Herding Kangaroos! Damn things won't go backwards :D

Quote:

Originally Posted by Regulus (Post 137644)

On the subject of languages, I remember quite fondly when I visited Sweden, just how easy it was to communicate with the locals.
So a question was posted to my Swedish friend: "why do the Swedish speak such good English?"
His answer was an exercise in understatement:
"Well, there's only 8 million people in the world who speak Swedish"!

moltuae 12th February 2018 03:16 PM

I'm in awe of people who can speak multiple languages. Apart from English, the only languages I'm fluent in are programming languages.

I did study Latin and French at school for a couple of years but dropped them in favour of the sciences. I do remember some of the Latin I learned (which is a great language to learn if you want to better understand the origins of many modern languages), but I remember little of the French I learned. Our school was one of the first to use audio tapes and headsets as language teaching aids. Ironically, just about the only French phrase I remember from those tapes is "écoute et répète" ("listen and repeat").





Speaking of Swedish (Regulus), something I've often wondered ...

Those silly IKEA product names ... You know, the ones that often sound like something related in English. Are they completely made up (for comic effect) or do they actually mean something in Swedish?

For example:

https://www.buzzfeed.com/leonoraepst...vWw#.qxyPzn7A3

Spanker 12th February 2018 05:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 27litres (Post 137624)
I've been trying to work out MJs signature for a while...
"Pecuariam felis"

Now, I've never learned any Latin (or any foreign language actually - not important for the edumacators of my schooling days! Though I have since taught myself some very very very very very basic German and Swedish - enough to know that our sentence structure is unecessarily bulky and back to front!), so had to take an electronic age approach - I used Google Translate!

So that results in "cat herding".
That didn't make a lot of sense...

So I try a couple of (non Google) Latin translators and I get a couple of different answers, such as "animal husbandry" and "work position" - ah! Now we're getting somewhere...

A general Google search suggests "pecuaria felis" instead - "agriculture recipes", hmm... No.

Maybe individual translations will provide some insight:
"Pecuariam" - "herding", we're back to that again!
"felis" - "football", hmm this isn't getting us anywhere!!
"Felis" is "cat", or at least it should be, so why has Google given me "football"??

The best I can find is that "pecuariam" is the feminine of "pecuarius" meaning "of cattle or sheep", but it's still not getting me anywhere!

I'm reading a bit far into this for an exercise in curiosity, and I'm on the verge of signing up for a Latin course!

I want it to mean "workaholic", or "feminine carriage builder" or something, but it's looking a lot like it means "cat lady"!

So please Michaela, satisfy my curiosity!

I had the same curiosity as you Marty but my Google searching coughed up nothing.

So I asked MJ for the answer in private so as not to embarrass myself by
1. Not knowing what it meant (I gave up Latin in secondary school like Mark did)
AND
2. Not knowing how to Google an answer correctly in the current age. :o

I guess that you have a few people a favour by raising this subject :D


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